Still Mr.and Mrs.

From  Elaine Pasquali
 Still Mr.and Mrs.
Author:  Mary McBride
 A delightful mystery that incorporates an attempt on the life of the mother of the President of the United States and an estranged couple of married Secret Service agents.  Fast moving and funny, it’s difficult to put down and leaves you wanting more.

Jenniemae and James, A black and White Memoir

From Margo Blatt
author: Newman, Brooke
Jenniemae and James, A black and White Memoir
I was pleasantly surprised that I enjoyed this book immensely.  I won it last year from the adult reading club.  I never read memiors before.  Didn’t think I’d like them.  But now I want to meet Brooke and her family.  She had a tough childhood but could have been worse. I loved the relationship between the 2 main characters.  I gave the book to my mom to read.  She must have hundreds of books to be read at her house and has given many away and I explained she had to read this one.  Hope she enjoys it as much as I did.

The fiddler in the subway : the true story of what happened when a world-class violinist played for handouts– and other virtuoso performances by America’s foremost feature writer

From Jackie Cantwell
author: Weingarten, Gene
The fiddler in the subway : the true story of what happened when a world-class violinist played for handouts– and other virtuoso performances by America’s foremost feature writer 
Mr. Weingarten is the winner of two Pulitzer Prizes for Feature Writing. This is a compilation of 20 essays (some funny, some sad, some thoughtful, all powerful) that have appeared in The Washington Post over the years.  “The Great Zucchini” is an essay, and the stage name for the Washington area’s most successful children’s entertainer.  Washington’s wealthy parents take their children’s birthday parties very seriously. The author succeeds in eliciting how the entertainer is so gifted with preschoolers.  “The armpit of America” could describe many towns, but Battle Mountain, Nevada was chosen for this article.  In Battle Mountain, there’s nothing to do but gamble and drink.  Even the representatives from the Chamber of commerce and the local newspaper can’t find anything good to say about the town.  The more somber essays are “Fear itself”, where the author rides a bus in Jerusalem to try to understand “the psychology of the terrorized”; “The first father” about President Clinton’s biological father; and “Fatal distraction”, about parents who accidentally leave their babies in a hot car.  “The fiddler in the subway” is the account of the day they arranged to have world-class violinist, Joshua Bell, play a Stradivarius violin in the Metro station for spare change. Would anyone notice the virtuoso in their midst?