The Panther

From Margaret Mezzacapo
Author: Nelson DeMille
The Panther
Another thriller, full of technical details and seemingly extensive research. This follows what seems to be a formula by the author – the daring exploits of wisecracking detective, John Corey, and his perfect, beautiful wife, Kate Mayfield, as they hunt down a terrorist leader in the Middle East. There were parts that made me think that DeMille could turn a trip to the grocery store into a techno-thriller, and parts where Detective Corey’s attitude, which is frequently sexist, grated on the nerves. The book does, however, make you wonder when hearing news about the Middle East.

Advertisements

The Kill Artist

From Hannah Columbo
author: Silva, Daniel
The Kill Artist
In this  first book of the Gabriel Allon series, Gabriel, a former assassin for Israel’s foreign intelligence service, the Mossad  retired after the murders of his wife and son to lead a quiet life as an art restorer, one who fixes the wounded past. Gabriel’s ex-boss, Ari Shamron, an Israeli spymaster,convinces Gabriel to leave his sheltered hermitage to hunt down Tariq, the assassin who killed Gabriel’s family.Silva explores the Palestinian-Israeli conflict from many, many angles.

Secret of the White Rose

From Rosemarie Jerome
author: Pintoff, Stefanie
 Secret of the White Rose
Anarchists? Blackmailers? Conspirators?  Who is killing judges?  And why are white roses, bibles and sheets of music left at the crime scenes?

Detective Simon Ziele and Criminologist Alistair Sinclair’s hunt for the killer takes them through the opulent world of high society and the poverty ridden streets of 1906 New York City.  It is a baffling case that has the public screaming for the blood of the anarchists, the media deciding guilt in their articles, and the commissioner pressuring his officers to find the suspects immediately.  Time is running out for Simon and Alistair. Will the truth be discovered or will the next victim hit closer to home?  Pintoff’s crime fighting duo are a perfect blend. Their differences in age, social class, and criminal investigation add dimension to the plot and make turn of the century New York come to life.  This is the third book in the series which includes “A Curtain Falls” and “In the Shadow of Gotham.”

Grace

From Carly Skudin, Teen Book reviewer
author: Scott, Elizabeth
Grace
Grace by Elizabeth Scott is about a girl named Grace who was raised to be an angel; a messenger of death by suicide bomb. She refuses to die for the cause and is on the run in search for freedom. She is traveling to reach a border she may never find. On her journey she travels amongst evil-minded soldiers on a battered and broken-down train across the desert. She is accompanied by a mysterious and puzzling character named Kerr on her journey for freedom at the border. Grace struggles to be invisible, but her fear of discovery appears large as she remembers and recalls the sequence of events and her struggling past that delivered her to her questionable or uncertain fate.

 In this book Elizabeth Scott creates a world where you are told what you will be. A life without choices and many, many sacrifices. A colorless life, without beauty and connection and it is excessively cruel. In such a basic story the reader’s mind is continuously swirling as it puts  together the pieces of information and the actions of the protagonist, Grace, and Kerr.

 To me, this book was exciting and kept you on the edge of your seat when you wanted to find out what the next obstacle would be on Grace’s quest for freedom. It was a bit confusing, however, with the characters and the fact that some characters were spirits. This book had some historical fiction and religious beliefs to it, with all of the sacrifices for an almighty Keran Berj. I would recommend this book for anyone who enjoys reading historical fiction, suspenseful books, and someone who can keep track of characters. Overall, it was a well-written book.

The President’s Vampire

From Rosemarie Jerome
author: Farnsworth, Christopher
 The President’s Vampire
In this sequel to Blood Oath, vampire Nathaniel Cade and his human handler, Zach Barrows, must save mankind from creatures who not only kill but spread their contagion that changes humans into snakeheads.  Suspend your disbelief for a wild non-stop action thriller adventure, the interaction between Cade and his sidekick Zach are worth the trip.

Wild Fire

From Roberta Berrios
author: DeMille, Nelson
 Wild Fire
Wild Fire-a right wing plot to end the threat of Middle East terrorism, a premise of unfathomable proportions-powerful Americans detonating nuclear bombs in two large American cities to begin a world war. DeMille’s previous protagonist, Detective John Corey, now on the government’s anti-terrorism task force, returns to the scene to foil this plan.  Although the thought of a simpler life at all costs might appeal to many, the high body count of unwarranted human destruction motivates Corey and his FBI agent wife to stop even the most high profile of political players. DeMille keeps the twists and turns coming from beginning to end in this thriller. The plausibility of this diabolical scheme is frightening!

The fiddler in the subway : the true story of what happened when a world-class violinist played for handouts– and other virtuoso performances by America’s foremost feature writer

From Jackie Cantwell
author: Weingarten, Gene
The fiddler in the subway : the true story of what happened when a world-class violinist played for handouts– and other virtuoso performances by America’s foremost feature writer 
Mr. Weingarten is the winner of two Pulitzer Prizes for Feature Writing. This is a compilation of 20 essays (some funny, some sad, some thoughtful, all powerful) that have appeared in The Washington Post over the years.  “The Great Zucchini” is an essay, and the stage name for the Washington area’s most successful children’s entertainer.  Washington’s wealthy parents take their children’s birthday parties very seriously. The author succeeds in eliciting how the entertainer is so gifted with preschoolers.  “The armpit of America” could describe many towns, but Battle Mountain, Nevada was chosen for this article.  In Battle Mountain, there’s nothing to do but gamble and drink.  Even the representatives from the Chamber of commerce and the local newspaper can’t find anything good to say about the town.  The more somber essays are “Fear itself”, where the author rides a bus in Jerusalem to try to understand “the psychology of the terrorized”; “The first father” about President Clinton’s biological father; and “Fatal distraction”, about parents who accidentally leave their babies in a hot car.  “The fiddler in the subway” is the account of the day they arranged to have world-class violinist, Joshua Bell, play a Stradivarius violin in the Metro station for spare change. Would anyone notice the virtuoso in their midst?