Midnight and the Meaning of Love

From Andrea Payne
author: Souljah, Sistah
Midnight and the Meaning of Love
I am a fan of “The Coldest Winter Ever,” but was deeply disappointed by this book.  This is not a sequel to that book and has nothing to do with “Coldest Winter Ever.”  I’m not intimidated by 500+ page books, but was really annoyed that the story didn?t even BEGIN until about page 200.  It was very slow in the beginning and many of the characters that she describes in the first 200 pages are never mentioned again in this story.  She overdid it with explaining all the nuances of Muslim faith and Japanese culture.  It was so bogged down in Religion, Anthropology &  Sociology that it subtracts from the story. 
Some of the story is all over the place and doesn’t make much sense; it also seems a little farfetched at times. At lot of events are just long and  drawn out.  Certain things that happen in this story where you would expect an explanation of why it happened- never appear.  I’m glad I borrowed this from the library because I would have been annoyed if I wasted money on this long book that was boring at times to the point where I fell asleep reading it.  The ending was also too vague and open and I seriously hope she is not planning another follow-up book to this  one.   This was an extremely substandard and horrible read.

Forbidden Lie$

From Ellen Druda
Forbidden Lie$ 
This one is very much of interest to libraries, since it’s about the author Norma Khouri and her 2003 best seller “Forbidden Love.” The book was presented as a true story about a young Muslim girl caught in an unapproved love affair who was then murdered by her brother.   A year after publication, an Australian journalist examined the details in the story and proved it all to be a figment of the author’s imagination. The film tells the story of Khouri’s rise to fame and her response to the accusations about the book.  What makes it so delicious to watch is the onion-peel method the film uses to tell us the story: we see Khouri dig herself deeper and deeper with lies and deceptions; explanations that seem logical at first reveal themselves to be truths about other falsehoods even more bizarre.  The DVD comes loaded with extras, including deleted scenes, featurettes, and terrific commentary with director Anna Broinowski and Khouri herself.

Forbidden Lie$

From Ellen Druda
Forbidden Lie$
This one is very much of interest to libraries, since it’s about the author Norma Khouri and her 2003 best seller “Forbidden Love.” The book was presented as a true story about a young Muslim girl caught in an unapproved love affair who was then murdered by her brother.   A year after publication, an Australian journalist examined the details in the story and proved it all to be a figment of the author’s imagination. The film tells the story of Khouri’s rise to fame and her response to the accusations about the book.  What makes it so delicious to watch is the onion-peel method the film uses to tell us the story: we see Khouri dig herself deeper and deeper with lies and deceptions; explanations that seem logical at first reveal themselves to be truths about other falsehoods even more bizarre.  The DVD comes loaded with extras, including deleted scenes, featurettes, and terrific commentary with director Anna Broinowski and Khouri herself.