Men at lunch [videorecording DVD] : the untold story of a city’s legend

From: Ellen Druda
Author:  Seán Ó Cualáin
Title:  Men at lunch [videorecording DVD] : the untold story of a city’s legend
You’ve seen the photograph: men sitting atop a steel construction beam, casually enjoying a lunch and cigarette break, boots dangling in the air with New York City hundreds of feet below. I can’t even look at it without lurching into vertigo. This documentary tells the story of the photograph – how it might have been taken, who the mystery photographer was, and attempts to identify the men in the picture too. The photo archives of the holder of the original negative reveals clues about the identity of the men involved, and from there filmmaker Seán Ó Cualáin pursues the friends and relatives of the names in order to finally establish the facts. It’s fun to follow along, and while back-tracking the story of this particular picture, Ó Cualáin also tells the story of immigration, particularly the Irish, and its importance in shaping New York City. Men at Lunch is for fans of the Big Apple and the role the Irish played in its history.

Brooklyn : a novel

From Alicja Feitzinger
author: Colm Toibin
Brooklyn : a novel
Eilis Lacey grew up in a small Irish town. Her father passed away a few years ago, her brothers immigrated to England and she lives with her mother, deep in the shadow of her charismatic sister Rose. She is attending bookkeeping classes at a local vocational school. She is more preoccupied with her studies than with her appearance.  At one of the dances she meets Jim Farrell, who is rude to her. She also learns a bitter lesson of human prejudice  while working in a local shop for cool and calculating Miss Kelly.

At this point, an offer to move to Brooklyn is presented to her and she agrees to embark on a journey to a foreign land.  She works and studies in Brooklyn while living in a boarding house.  Most unexpectedly, she falls in love with Tony, but devastating news from Ireland  brings her back home for a long visit, where she is faced with most difficult choices. 

This is a very quiet, but touching novel, full of interesting and believable characters. It targets dilemmas of human heart, common to all immigrants and people who moved away from their hometown.

Welcome

From Alicja Feitzinger
titl: Welcome [videorecording]
Welcome is a story about Bilal (Firat Ayverdi) and Simon (Vincent Lindon).  Bilal is a 17-year-old Kurdish refugee. He spent the last three months of his life traveling across Europe in an attempt to reunite with his girlfriend who recently emigrated to England. Simon (Vincent Lindon), a middle-aged swimming instructor, is dealing with a divorce from his wife (Audrey Dana).  They meet at a local swimming pool at Calais, France. Simon works there and eventually trains Bilal, so he can attempt to swim across the English Channel and find his girlfriend. Both men have a lot in common, despite their differences.  They develop a strong bond, which will ultimately alter their lives.  This movie left me with a strong impression and a lot to think about. I highly recommend it.