Lost Boy

From Ginny Pisciotta
Author:  Brent W. Jeffs
 Lost Boy

Lost Boy is a fascinating but horrifying account of life as a member of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, known a FLDS, a polygamist sect that broke off from mainstream Mormonism.

Brent is the nephew of Warren Jeffs, the jailed “prophet” of the group and the grandson of former ”prophet” Ruland Jeffs.  Brent shows how it is not only the girls and women who suffer in this lifestyle, but also the boys, many of whom were sexually abused, and pushed out as they got older so that the young girls could be given to the prophet and older men  who were in his favor.

Warren Jeffs, a sexual pervert, seized more and more power  till he had total control.  Everyone lived in fear that if they disobeyed any of the arbitrary rules, they would not only lose their salvation,  they would lose their homes and family.  Jeffs, who arranged every marriage, could take wives and children from a man and assign them to someone else.  He could take away homes.

Many of the boys who left, either because they were forced out or because of the miserable circumstances,  were ill-equipped to handle the outside world and became addicted to drugs and alcohol.  The author lost 2 brothers -one committed suicide and the other died of an overdose that may have been intentional.  The author also resorted to drugs, suffering greatly from repressed memories of the sexual abuse he endured as a child from his uncle. Brent eventually initiated the legal action against his uncle.

The book presents all too clearly the dangers of absolute power.  You wonder why people would stay and live under such conditions, but Brent Jeffs shows exactly how people can be brainwashed little by little until they can no longer think for themselves.

 

A Small Death in the Great Glen

From Eileen Effrat
Author:  A.D. Scott
A Small Death in the Great Glen
For an atmospheric portrayal of 1950’s Scotland, this is a good pick. As Scotland struggles to adjust to a post World War II world, a young boy is found murdered in a canal. Suspicion automatically falls on the town’s “outsiders” —refugee Poles, an Italian restaurant owner, and a band of Gaelic tinkers. As the investigation proceeds, it begins to reveal some very unpleasant secrets concealed by the very “pillars of the town”. Scott’s sequel, A Double Death in the Black Isle, is just as enjoyable.