PEOPLE OF THE BOOK

From adele gresser

Title:  PEOPLE OF THE BOOK

Author:  GERALDINE BROOKS

 

a RELIGIOUS BOOK  FOUND IN Sarajevo and a young lady from Australia, Hannah Heath, noted for her supreme talent of repairing old artifacts, was asked to appraise whether it was truly the ancient Sarajevo HAGGADA. THE WORLD BELEVED THE GERMANS HAD DESTROYED ALL JEWISH BOOKS. HANNA FINDS IN THE BOOK’S BINDING A SERIES OF TINY ARTIFACTS IN ITS BINDING:an insert wing fragment, wine stains, salt crystals and a white hair. To learn about how each of the components, you will need to read this enlightening book.

“Time Enough at Last” from The twilight zone. Season 1

From Andrea  Kalinowski
Author:  Lyn  Venable
“Time Enough at Last” from The twilight zone. Season 1 [videorecording DVD]
Time Enough at Last” is a television episode of The Twilight Zone, which is now on DVD. The television episode was based on a short story written by Lyn (Marilyn) Venable. It is a Twilight Zone episode with which all librarians can sympathize to a degree. Henry Bemis, played by Burgess Meredith, is a glasses-wearing bank teller with the soul of a reader. Everyone is exhorting him to focus on real life when he would rather be lost in the pages of a book, any book. One day at work, the unthinkable happens. He glances at the paper, while in the vault enjoying lunch and the headline screams “H-Bomb.” The earth beneath him begins to ripple and when it stills again, he emerges and finds the promised destruction. He is alone and free to pursue his passion. He finds a destroyed library and begins to build piles of books for this week, next week, and the week thereafter and then the unthinkable happens … .

Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: my year of magical reading

From Catherine Given
Author:  Nina Sankovitch
Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: my year of magical reading
I just finished Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: My Year of Magical Reading by Nina Sankovitch, about a woman who self-prescribes a book a day for a year as a way to re-group after her beloved sister’s death.  It’s a beautifully written story of lessons distilled from 365 authors’ works.  By briefly sharing what she derives from the experience and how she applies writers’ messages to her own life, Sankovitch creates a unique memoir, one that any avid reader of books will appreciate.  She also provides a list of richly meaningful non-fiction and fiction books to add to our own must-reads.  She says:

\”Words are witness to life: They record what has happened and they make it real. . . . Stories about lives remembered bring us backward while allowing us to move forward.  The only balm to sorrow is memory:  The only salve for the pain of losing someone to death is acknowledging the life that existed before.\”

Tolstoy and the Purple Chair will likely be cherished by anyone mourning the loss of a loved one.  For others, it will provide an affirmation of the value of thoughtful reading of good literature.

Forbidden Lie$

From Ellen Druda
Forbidden Lie$ 
This one is very much of interest to libraries, since it’s about the author Norma Khouri and her 2003 best seller “Forbidden Love.” The book was presented as a true story about a young Muslim girl caught in an unapproved love affair who was then murdered by her brother.   A year after publication, an Australian journalist examined the details in the story and proved it all to be a figment of the author’s imagination. The film tells the story of Khouri’s rise to fame and her response to the accusations about the book.  What makes it so delicious to watch is the onion-peel method the film uses to tell us the story: we see Khouri dig herself deeper and deeper with lies and deceptions; explanations that seem logical at first reveal themselves to be truths about other falsehoods even more bizarre.  The DVD comes loaded with extras, including deleted scenes, featurettes, and terrific commentary with director Anna Broinowski and Khouri herself.

Forbidden Lie$

From Ellen Druda
Forbidden Lie$
This one is very much of interest to libraries, since it’s about the author Norma Khouri and her 2003 best seller “Forbidden Love.” The book was presented as a true story about a young Muslim girl caught in an unapproved love affair who was then murdered by her brother.   A year after publication, an Australian journalist examined the details in the story and proved it all to be a figment of the author’s imagination. The film tells the story of Khouri’s rise to fame and her response to the accusations about the book.  What makes it so delicious to watch is the onion-peel method the film uses to tell us the story: we see Khouri dig herself deeper and deeper with lies and deceptions; explanations that seem logical at first reveal themselves to be truths about other falsehoods even more bizarre.  The DVD comes loaded with extras, including deleted scenes, featurettes, and terrific commentary with director Anna Broinowski and Khouri herself.