WRITING OUR WAY HOME

From adele gresser
Title:  WRITING OUR WAY HOME
Author:  TED SELOTAROSS
THIS BOOK IS A COMPILATION OF SHORT STORIES WRITTEN BY WELL KNOWN AUTHORS OF THE JEWISH FAITH AND SOME UNKNOWN TO ME AUTHORS.  SOME OF THE STORIES ARE ON ASSIMILATION,EMERGING FEMINISM, RELIGIOUS IDEALS AND SECULAR AND TRADITIONAL THOUGHTS.  MANY OF THESE STORIES WERE BEYOND MY UNDERSTANDING.  I DID, HOWEVER, ENJOY SAUL BELLOW, E. L. DOCTOROW, BERNARD BELLOW PHILLIP ROTH, I. B.SINGER WHO WERE FEATURED IN THIS BOOK I READ AS A READING CLUB MEMBER.

Never Let Me Go

From Grace Segers
 Title:  Never Let Me Go
Author:  Kazuo Ishiguro
To say that this novel broke my heart would be an understatement. It is breathtakingly beautiful in style and content. Ishiguro has managed to make the protagonist, who navigates youth throughout the novel, sound like an actual teenager, which, as a teenager myself, is a characteristic of the novel that is both important and impressive. I cannot recommend this book more. It was absolutely, positively fantastic.

White truffles in winter

From Rosemarie Jerome
Author: N.M. Kelby
White truffles in winter : a novel
This literary gem needs to be shared. It is a quiet, intense portrayal of a man who loved two women but whose passion was food. This man is the great French chef Auguste Escoffier and this is his elegant “memoir in meals.” Like his magnificent culinary creations, there is a complexity to this story that evokes the spirit of the time and captures the essence of the man. His was a life of extremes: suffering and captivity during the Franco-Prussian War; wealth and splendor communing with royalty, high society, the powerful, and poverty in his declining years. The cornucopia of images and feelings bombard the senses and creates a rich realism that you could almost touch and taste. Escoffier did not want to be forgotten, this story makes you want to know more about the man who was an epicurean genius yet a sad, idealistic romantic.

The Great Gatsby

From Julie Rosslee
author: Fitzgerald, F. Scott
The Great Gatsby
I haven’t read this text in years and it was such a thrill to be able to pick it up and fall in love with Fitzerald’s story once again.  Reading this as a teenager, I may have been naive about several of the characters’ identity crisis and transformations, but now, seeing it through the eyes of adult, I truly appreciate the full essence of each of the characters, especially Gatsby.

The Count of Monte Cristo

From Rebecca Segers
author: Dumas, Alexandre
The Count of Monte Cristo
Edmond Dantes has it all: youth, love, and career mobility.  But a jealous rival for his job and another for his fiance falsely accuse him of Bonapartism and a judge looking out for his own interests seals the deal, sending Dantes to the prison Chateau d’If.  There he struggles in solitary for years, until he meets the Abbe Faria, who teaches him and opens his heart to the power of human friendship.  They plan their joint escape, but Faria dies before it is able to be effected, thus leaving Dantes alone again – but this time with the knowledge of the whereabouts of a great hidden treasure.  Dantes escapes, claims the fortune and remakes himself as the Count of Monte Cristo, with the sole purpose of avenging his false imprisonment by ruining the men who put him there.  He does manage his aim, but along the way, also discovers that revenge is not a suitable reason for living. He is redeemed by the love he had for his former fiance, the love he still has for the family who remained true, and the love he begins to have for a woman in his current life.  This novel, published in 1844, is still just as entertaining as it was the day it came out, a page-turner for anyone looking for an adventure that takes them into the devastation of prison life, the glamorous world of 19th century Paris or the unmapped territory of the human heart.

The house of mirth

From Charlene Muhr
author: Wharton, Edith
The house of mirth [sound recording]
I recently listened to the audio book The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton, read by Barbara Caruso.  Caruso mesmerizes the listener with her reading of this classic novel.  Wharton’s novel was first published in 1905, and it was her first important work of fiction.  The novel deals with the social classes in the late nineteenth century.  Lily Bart is twenty-nine, unmarried, and obsessed with wealth and luxury.  She is dependent on her aunt for her meager allowance and the only way to secure her place among the upper class is to marry a wealthy man.  Lily has passed up some marriage proposals, always feeling she could do better.  She even turns away from her true love, Lawrence Selden, because he couldn’t provide her with the life she desired.  Lily’s obsessions, gambling addiction, and bad relationships, cause her to fall from her aunt’s good graces and be rejected by her friends.  Her world as she knows it collapses and she is faced with only one tragic choice.