Gypped

 

From Elaine Pasquali

 

Title: Gypped

Author: Carol Higgins Clark

Jack and Regan Reilly go to Los Angeles. where Jack is attending a law enforcement conference. The conference presents a change for a much wanted rest and . Or does it? Regan meets her old friend, Zelda, who recently inherited $8 million. Instead of fun and relaxation, Regan gets discovers a scheme to swindle Zelda of her millions and Regan is almost murdered for her troubles. A vacation this trip was not, but it was a fun, relaxing read.

 

The devil wears Prada

From  vendula schonfeldova

Title:  The devil wears Prada

Author:  Lauren Weisberger

A young Andrea becomes an assistant to Miranda (amazingly successful editor of a magazine). Andrea gets tested each and every day. The only advantage coming from being hold every late night and working all day long is a recommendation from Miranda that will get Andrea a top job at any magazine of her choosing. She eventually realizes that maybe this job is not worthy of giving up her life and mainly her soul and needs to decide if she rather takes off or let kill herself being employed for any longer. Even thought She quits, she will get her recommendation she has dream of.

Chestnut Street

From Margaret Mezzacapo

Chestnut Street by Maeve Binchy

When I reviewed A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy, I noted that it was the last book she wrote before her death. Turns out, not quite . . . Chestnut Street is a collection of short stories published posthumously. The common thread is that all of the characters live on the same street, albeit with different lives and circumstances, and serve as proof that appearances can be deceiving. People can differ significantly from the images they project (although you’ve never met such a large cast of philandering husbands and deserting fathers in any of Binchy’s prior works). The stories seem a little disjointed at times, yet you’ll still hear the lilt of the characters’ accents as you read along, and you’ll still wish that there would be more Maeve Binchy books to come.

My Nest Isn’t Empty, It Just Has More Closet Space

From  elaine pasquali

Title:  My Nest Isn’t Empty, It Just Has More Closet Space 

Author:  Lisa Scottoline and Francesca Scottoline Serritella

This is a mother-daughter endeavor.  Each chapter recounts family events, relationships, and secrets of their nuclear and extended families.  Each chapter has a generational spin..  Each chapter stands alone.  Each chapter is short, pithy, and humorous.  A quick and entertaining read.

Don’t Look Down

From Elaine Pasquali

Title:  Don’t Look Down

Author:  Jennifer Crusie  and Bob Mayer

A difficult book to get into.  In the first dozen pages, twelve characters, give or take a few, were introduced.  In addition, characters were alternately referred to by their first names, their surnames, and/or their nicknames.   I was unwilling to plow through the ensuing confusion and discover the nature of the plot.  It’s unusual for me to give up on a book, but that’s exactly what I did with Don’t Look Down.

 

The tao of Martha : my year of LIVING, or why I’m never getting all that glitter off of the dog

From  Margaret Mezzacapo
Author:  Jen Lancaster
Title:  The tao of Martha : my year of LIVING, or why I’m never getting all that glitter off of the dog 
When I read the first review of this book, I wasn’t too interested in reading it, as it seemed to have the potential to be seriously annoying. The book is actually better than that, but not by an awful lot. The author basically decides to spend a year of her life asking, “What would Martha do?” and proceeding to follow Martha Stewart’s rules and principles. The book is occasionally humorous, with a sprinkling of seemingly gratuitous four-letter words. It also made me wish I had as much time on my hands as the author seems to have.

Not a feather, but a dot [videorecording DVD]

From Ellen Druda
Author:  Teju Prasad
Title:  Not a feather, but a dot [videorecording DVD]
Like many immigrant groups, Indian-Americans have had to deal with prejudice, stereotypes, and just plain ignorance. Teju Prasad is a young, imaginative filmmaker with family and cultural roots in India.  His documentary film explains the origins of some of the stereotypes and common misconceptions of Indians, and then he pokes fun at some of the sillier ones using skits, animations, and unexpected interruptions. While the story of ignorance between different immigrant groups is the same for many, Prasad presents the Indian-American view in a way both informative and friendly. This will appeal to teens and young adults because of its light-hearted tone. This is a great discussion starter on the subjects of prejudice and cultural differences.

Insane city [sound recording CD] : [a novel]

From Jackie Cantwell
Author:  Dave Barry
Title:  Insane city [sound recording CD] : [a novel]
This laugh-out-loud romp could only be brought to you by Dave Barry. We meet our protagonist, Seth, as he’s heading to his eco-friendly wedding at the Ritz Carlton in Key Biscayne.  He’s set to marry Tina, a beautiful, Harvard lawyer from a wealthy family, who really should be out of his league.  The zany characters include strippers, an escaped orangutan, angry cops, angry pimps, an Albino python, Haitian refugees, etc. Hilarious situations include a hijacked pirate ship, a misplaced batch of marijuana brownies, and a billionaire whose wish is to join a secret society. This is a real page turner (or disc turner) as the reader wonders “Will the ‘groom posse’ rescue Seth from himself?” and “Will the wedding go off as planned”?