Doctored : the disillusionment of an American physician

From Margaret Mezzacapo

Author:  Sandeep  Jauhar

Title:  Doctored : the disillusionment of an American physician  

Sandy Jauhar, author of the bestseller  Intern, has now become a physician in private practice, and quickly finds out that medicine is being practiced in a way that is totally unexpected to him.  As with so many other things, the drive for the almighty dollar pervades the conditions under which he functions. He just wants to practice medicine, but realizes that he needs to perfect social skills so he can get along with his fellow physicians and thus generate referrals and other economic avenues.  Add in a wife, a physician herself , who seems to personify the term “money-hungry,” and Jauhar finds himself immensely impacted by stress, and questioning his own abilities. This is an interesting look into the reality of today’s medical world.

Love Always, Petra

From Vendula Schonfeldova

Title:  Love Always, Petra

Author:  Petra Nemcova

Czech girl is telling a story of the most terrifying experience of her life – tsunami of 2004 in Thailand came unannounced and took lots of lives, even the life of Petra’s fiancé. She is telling a story of her beginning as a model and how much she gave to make her future better, all that and more.

Seriously…I’m kidding

From Vendula Schonfeldova

Title:  Seriously…I’m kidding

Author:  Ellen DeGeneres

Ellen writes about sharing her life with readers, how she sees the life, as we take everything too seriously and forget enjoying life as it is, how much courage it took to accomplish and achieve all the stuff she gets. She gives an advices to people how to care about our body, mind and she doesn’t forget to say jokes what makes book even more readable. She shares her ideas and opinions with public.

Love, Nina : a nanny writes home

From Catherine Given
Author:  Nina Stibbe
Title:  Love, Nina : a nanny writes home 
Love, Nina: A Nanny Writes Home is a fun book full of quirky British humor about a 20-year-old’s early 1980’s adventures as a nanny in London.  Nina’s story is told exclusively via letters she wrote to her sister, describing her adjustment to working for a single-Mom professor with two boys. Her deadpan play-by-play account of the boys’ obsessive over-examination of their lives is hilarious. Her pared-down, transcript style makes for a very intimate and quick energetic read.

Nina also recounts her everyday dealings and dinner conversations with literary luminaries including those of actor/director Alan Bennett. His wry and wittily avuncular interactions with Nina’s host family add extra spice to Nina’s musings.

Coming Clean

From Margaret Mezzacapo
Author: Kimberly Rae Miller
Title: Coming Clean
Kimberly Miller’s parents were hoarders – but they were the hoarders who love her. This memoir, which takes place on Long Island, discusses her life with packrat parents who wanted the best for her but seemed physically unable to give her a childhood like all the other kids had. The clutter ruined aspects of her life and shaped the adult she would become. The book is interesting, compassionate, funny, and sad. I would recommend it for anyone.

Blue plate special : an autobiography of my appetites

From Margaret Mezzacapo
Author: Kate Christensen
Title: Blue plate special : an autobiography of my appetites
This is a fun book to read IMHO. The author recounts her childhood, parts of which were spent as a hippie in Berkeley, and her formative years spent in areas all over the country. There are times that it seems like she can’t wait to get away from her family, and times she can’t wait to either get back to them, or to establish relationships that are quasi-family.
When she says “appetites” with a plural, she’s not kidding – hunger can take many forms, both physical and emotional. This was a rollicking read.

Nine Lives

From Margaret Mezzacapo

Nine Lives, by Brandon Baltzley

The author, a chef, seems to have attended the Keith Richards Culinary School, in that both have assaulted their bodies with vast quantities of alcohol, illicit drugs, women (both with and without jealous husbands,) and any other vices you want to throw in. Baltzley details how he blew one job opportunity after another, but always sought to improve his cooking skills. At the end of the book, he gets straight. You hope for his sake that he can maintain it.

P.S. This is not for the reader who would be offended by graphic sexual detail, plus he writes as if he gets paid extra for every “F-bomb” he drops.