Secret Daughter

From Michele Lauer-Bader
author: Gowda, Shilpi Somaya
Secret Daughter
This moving novel tells the story of Kavita in India who gives away her baby daughter in order to save her, and Somer in California who adopts her.  It is about two mothers who both love their daughter and what they learn about themselves. This story speaks of motherhood (and fatherhood) and the loss they all share. The writing is excellent, the characters are real. You won’t put it down.

Revolution

From Joanna, Teen Book Reviewer
author: Donnelly, Jennifer
Revolution
Revolution is a story about a troubled girl named Andi Alpers. She suffers from depression after her brother was killed by a schizophrenic, blaming herself for his death. She stops trying in school, causing her grades to plummet. Her one saving grace is music. Andi plays the guitar as an escape from reality, as well as abusing her antidepressants. When the school contacts her parents and informs them that Andi is about to be expelled unless she can write a great senior thesis, her father steps in and takes her to Paris with him for winter break. When Andi finds a diary dating back to the French Revolution, she reads it obsessively.

The diary contains the story of Alexandrine Paradis, a girl in Paris who wants to be a play performer. She gets noticed by the queen after making the sad prince laugh, and is made his acquaintance. While at first  she is using him so she will be able to perform center stage, she soon loves the small boy. All is well until the royal family is killed off one by one, with the small prince imprisoned in a tower until death.

One night during a rave in the catacombs, the diary becomes reality and Andi finds herself trapped in revolutionary Paris.  This book was bittersweet in a
way because not all was lost, but not all was won. I didn’t really like the depressed tone of Andi – trying to kill herself one day and then trying
whatever it takes to stay alive the next, only to try to commit suicide a few hours later. Other than that, the book was good and well-written. I’d recommend
it to someone who doesn’t mind sad endings and someone who enjoys historical fiction.

Touch

From Darci, Teen Book Reviewer
author: Prose, Francine
Touch
This is a very emotional book about a girl, Maisie, who is violated on the school bus by three of her best guy friends who she realizes later, aren’t her best friends at all. As things get tougher in school for Maisie, she realizes she could really use some support from them. Her step-mom wanting to proceed in a lawsuit aganist the three boys isn’t helping at all and makes Maisie relive the horrific experience over and over again. This book is ok for anyone ages 12 and above. The story is suspenseful, makes you wonder what really did happen, and warns of the effects that lying can have.

It leaves a mark on you long after your done reading the book. I thought it was very good and would recommend it to others.

The Miles Between

From Eric, Teen Book Reviewer
author: Pearson, Mary E.
The Miles Between
The Miles Between is a unique story about four unique people. The main character is Destiny Faraday, a student at Hedgebrook Academy who tends to separate herself from the other students. Destiny has secrets, but chooses not to share them with anyone. All she truly wants in life is just “one fair day” where the good guy wins and everything works out for the best. One day Destiny and three of her classmates, Seth, Mira and Aidan happen to find a running convertible conveniently located on school grounds, and for once they decide to break the monotonous routine that has consumed then since they came to Hedgebrook. Throughout that trip they find friendship and much more. The foursome was able to put to rest many of the difficult things they had each endured during their short lives. Destiny is the one who has suffered the most, and thanks to her newfound friends, she is able to find peace and a brighter tomorrow. The Miles  Between is a story of fate, friendship, and accepting and confronting our past as a part of who we are as people. I would
recommend this for teenage readers, as the story provides an interesting perspective on life that will make a reader appreciate all that he or she has. It is an emotional story that I will not soon forget.

Crunch time

From Andrea Kalinowski
author: Davidson, Diane Mott
Crunch time
Crunch time by Diane Mott Davidson was anentertaining read but for the first time, Goldy Schulz really got on my nerves with her insistence on bulldozing ahead. She blithely disregards her husband’s concerns for her safety and just blunders around in his case. Her husband suggests they expand their family  but I am wondering if his ulterior or hidden motive is to ground Goldy. The book focuses mainly on the issue of Cuban refugees and their boat captains. Yolanda, one of Goldy’s support staff and her friend, and Ferdinanda, her aunt, have earned the enmity of Kurt, Yolanda’s former boyfriend turned stalker. There are various other threads woven through the story but Goldy’s insistence on forcing her nose into everything was a great irritant to me this time. I felt like tapping her shoulder and ordering her to a timeout.